The Cleveland Water Blog

Tags: Lake Erie

Cooler Weather Will Reduce Lake Levels

As colder air masses move over a warm Lake Erie, people who frequent the coast should notice a change – decreasing lake levels.

Lake Erie Summer Stratification is Underway

Over the summer months, Cleveland Water staff have been closely watching as the waters of Lake Erie separate into distinct layers – a layer of warm water at the surface and a cold water layer at the bottom of the lake.

Historic Lake Levels Could Supply Almost 50 Years of Tap Water

In Lake Erie’s recorded history, we’ve never seen water levels this high.

How Cleveland Water is Prepared for Lake Erie Summer Water Quality

Every summer, as the temperature of Lake Erie slowly climbs in advance of the annual lake stratification, Cleveland Water closely monitors the lake's water quality for any issues that might follow.

Protect Lake Erie by Protecting its Watershed

Our 1.4 million customers are part of the more than 12 million people who rely on Lake Erie as their source of drinking water. Clean water and a healthy Lake Erie is critical not only for our community to survive but for it to thrive as a region that leverages its assets to build economic, social and environmental well-being for all.

2018 Water Quality Report Now Available

Each year Cleveland Water issues a Water Quality Report for our customers. This annual report, also called a Consumer Confidence Report, provides a review of our water quality during the past year, including testing results and information.

Partnerships Help Ensure Clean and Safe Drinking Water

Cleveland Water takes pride in ensuring the water we treat and deliver to your tap meets and exceeds federal and state water quality regulations as well as industry standards.

Without Lake Erie, Cleveland Could Have Been Even Colder

At Cleveland Water, every day we are thankful to have a massive supply of fresh water at our doorstep. But during the polar vortex, we were thankful for a different reason.

Lake Erie Ice Season Is Here

Several days ago we told you that Lake Erie’s bottom water temperatures had reached below the magic number of 39.2°F, meaning the surface could freeze as long as the air temperature above the lake stayed below freezing.

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